Category Archives: Presentations

What the science says on the impact of neonicotinoids on our pollinators

Screen Shot 2015-07-01 at 8.51.49 AMThis presentation, delivered both for the East Texas Beekeepers Association and at the Overton Field day (2015), gives some components to consider when looking at the impact of neonics on pollinators. The general public is very quick to call upon a ban on neonics for killing our bees – but the situation is really not that simple. In this presentation, I try to shed light on both sides of the argument that neonics are responsible for pollinator population decline.

 

 

Growing flowering plants that are safe for pollinators in the yard and garden

Protecting your pollinatorsA presentation delivered by Dr. David Smitley from Michigan State University (Department of Entomology) on “Growing Flowering Plants that are Safe for Pollinators in the Yard and Garden” presented at the 19th Annual Ornamental Workshop on Diseases and Insects. The presentation focuses primarily on neonicotinoids, which have received a lot of media and public attention recently. (Sharing with permission from Dr. Smitley).

What bugs are eating your money? Main culprits, new invasives and how we can stop them from eating your crops

Screen Shot 2014-09-09 at 3.32.12 PMOriginally created for the Texas Nursery and Landscape Association 2014 Expo, this presentation outlines five common pests found in greenhouse ornamentals and turf crops, how to monitor them and management strategies, as well as informing growers about new invasive insects they should keep their eyes open for.

Why and How Aphids Suck

Why and How aphids suckThere are thousands of species of aphids and any grower that tells you they don’t have them must not get out much.  Aphids reproduce at an alarming rate, with newborn aphids already developing embryos the moment they are born.  Apparently they are in a rush!  This is a 30-minute slideshow on aphids and their control.

 

 

 

 

 

Spotted Wing Drosophila

Fly on a cherryA short presentation on Spotted Wing Drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, which is a new pest to North America (2008).  It is a new pest to many soft-bodied fruit, such as cherries, strawberries, blackberries, raspberries and blueberries.  If you think you may have Spotted Wing Drosophila in your crop, be sure to contact me and send a sample if possible.