Research

Every year we conduct several trials, testing the effectiveness of new insecticides before they are on the market, determining potential phytotoxicity of new pesticides, studying new invasive pests and new effective strategies for pest management for East Texas Greenhouse and Nursery Growers. Our data is often published in publicly available (open-access) journals or in trade magazines. Come back and visit soon to see a summary of the work we do and our key findings.

Crapemyrtle Bark Scale

Crapemyrtle Bark Scale

The Crapemyrtle bark scale is an invasive scale pest that infests the bark of crapemyrtles. We are a part of a multi-state collaborative team that, amongst many objectives, is determining best management strategies for this particular pest. To see information from the whole team, please visit stopcmbs.com. Other Crapemyrtle bark scale resources: Current insecticide efficacy summary for nursery growers Extension Publication on Crapemyrtle Bark Scale Publication on population dynamics of crapemyrtle bark scale crawlers For more information on the crapemyrtle ...
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Biological Control with Natural Enemies

Biological Control with Natural Enemies

An increase in pesticide-resistant pests (such as the prevalence of Q-biotype whiteflies), more stringent pesticide applicator regulations, and pressure from retailers is putting effective pest management at risk. The practice of purchasing bulk beneficial insects (predators and/or parasitic wasps) to manage pests is already common practice in Northeastern USA, Canada, Europe, and other parts of the world, but has yet to be adopted by growers in Texas. The reason for this lack of adoption in Texas may be due to ...
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Small Efficacy Trials

Small Efficacy Trials

Every year we conduct several small-scale trials to determine the efficacy of either new pesticides or management strategies against new pests. The results from these trials are often published in Arthropod Management Tests (see this tutorial on how to navigate and interpret Arthropod Management Tests Publications), but also summarize the results from our studies down below ...
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Pollinator Project

Pollinator Project

Pollinator Citizen Science Project This project started as a collaboration between research and extension personnel at Texas A&M University, Tarleton State University, Texas Tech University, and Oklahoma State University. We were frequently asked by master gardeners, landscapers, and homeowners what plants they should put in their garden to attract pollinators. Unfortunately, there is a lack of data-driven resources to help decide what plants to put in the garden. The purpose of this project is to use citizen scientists to determine ...
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